Can you get RACGP registration?

Globe-300x200Getting registered with the RACGP to work as a GP in Australia

Overview

All of our jobs are open to “Category 1” doctors as assessed by the RACGP. For UK or Irish GPs this equates to having MRCGP and JCPTGP / CCT / PMETB qualifications. For GPs from New Zealand, this equates to Fellowship with The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners (FRNZCGP). However, we have some jobs which are suitable for  GPs who have been given “category 2” by the RACGP. These are usually out of the main city areas in more rural locations.

RACGP registration

To work as  GP in Australia, you need to be registered with the RACGP (Royal Australian College of GPs). This is quite complex and the whole process takes about 5 months.

You can only gain registration once you have a confirmed job offer – the signed contract is one of the documents the RACGP requests as part of the process.

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Our full time vacancies in Private or Corporate practice are for “Category 1 doctors” (see below).  The following notes are our understanding of the current system. Please note that each application is assessed individually, so our advice is just a guide – please send us your detailed CV if you’d like more advice:

Category 1 – Eligibility for Private and Corporate practice jobs near to the main cities:
For these vacancies, doctors must be classified by the RACGP (Royal Australian College of GPs) as being at the same level as an Australian trained specialist and for whom there is no need for a College examination, no assessment of general practice experience, and no further training required. This is “Category 1”. If you’ve trained in the UK and you have MRCGP (by examination) and either a CCT (granted via prescribed experience) or hold the old JCPTGP certificate (granted via prescribed experience), then you should be a category 1 doctor.  If you’ve trained in Ireland and you’re a graduate of the ICGP and hold MICGP membership, then you should also be classed as Category 1. If you’ve trained in New Zealand and you hold Fellowship with The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners (FRNZCGP), then you should also be classed as Category 1.

Please note that the RACGP has decided that all applicants with iMAP MRCGP  will now be classed as Category 2.  They’ve also said that doctors with MRCGP and who’ve gained their CCT or JCPTGP or CEGPR via equivalent experience, will be individually assessed as to whether they are Category 1 or Category 2.  There is more information here: http://www.racgp.org.au/assessment/pathways/specialistpathway

There is more information on registration on the AMC and the RACGP websites:

http://www.amc.org.au/index.php/ass/apo/spp/spfr

http://www.racgp.org.au/assessment/pathways/specialistpathway

In essence, the application process goes like this:

  • Sort out all your documents.
  • Apply online to the AMC for EICS / ECFMG verification of your MBBS and MRCGP (MICGP / FRNZCGP)
  • Send notarised copies of MBBS and your specialist GP qualification, along with various application forms and the fee to the AMC
  • Once received by the AMC, begin the RACGP side of things via their portal
  • Upload the documents they request, along with confirmed job offer / job description and arrange for certificates of good standing to be sent to the RACGP directly
  • The RACGP then assesses you and (hopefully) gives you Category 1 status and “FELLOWSHIP ad eundum gradum”.
  • You now have 6 months in which to take up your job

Beyond the AMC & RACGP

Once you’ve got RACGP recognition to be a Category 1 GP in Australia, you’ll then need to get AHPRA registration (AHPRA are state bodies which regulate doctors within their area – rather like the UK’s PCTs). When that’s done, you apply, via your employer for a Visa. This this page for more information on Visas: http://www.gpjobsinaustralia.co.uk/457-or-permanent-residency-186-visa/

We have full details on how to do the application, which we send to doctors once they have a job offer.

I recently moved to Perth in Western Australia to start work as a General Practitioner. It was a daunting prospect initially, when searching for suitable posts, especially without having been to Australia before. The formal registration process appeared challenging and time-consuming to start with. However, during the process, I found Monique and Paul to be very supportive, providing reliable and accurate information when needed. I would highly recommend using their valuable insight to those contemplating the move in the near future.
Dr Arya